No comment

On 19/07/2014, in Uncategorized, by steve

Let the text of this NOTAM stand here as silent testimony to the abyss into which humans can descend. Shame on those who have done this outrage. Look at the crash-site photo. It is not rescue workers and accident investigators who were on the scene but guys with guns slung on their shoulders…  After this, the world will never be the same.

UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE, DUE TO RECENT EVENTS, ALL FLIGHT OPERATIONS BY UNITED STATES (U.S.) OPERATORS WITHIN THE SIMFEROPOL (UKFV) AND DNEPROPETROVSK (UKDV) FIRS ARE PROHIBITED. EVENTS HAVE INDICATED THE POTENTIAL FOR CONTINUED HAZARDOUS ACTIVITIES.  THIS ACTION EXPANDS A PROHIBITION OF U.S. FLIGHT OPERATIONS ISSUED BY THE FAA INITIALLY AS A NOTAM ON APRIL 3, 2014, AND LATER AS SFAR NO. 113 OVER THE CRIMEAN REGION OF UKRAINE AND ADJACENT AREAS OF THE BLACK SEA AND THE SEA OF AZOV. THE PROHIBITIONS DESCRIBED IN THE SPECIFIED AIRSPACE CONTAINED IN THIS NOTAM AND THE ASSOCIATED JUSTIFICATION FOR THIS SPECIAL NOTICE WILL BE RE-EVALUATED BY 31 OCT 2014. 18 JUL 00:30 2014 UNTIL 1410312359. CREATED: 18 JUL 00:41 2014

crash

1


FAA Issues Policy to Improve Workplace Safety for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers

On 22/08/2013, in Uncategorized, by steve

cabin-crewThe U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), working with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), today issued a final policy for improving workplace safety for aircraft cabin crewmembers.

While the FAA’s aviation safety regulations take precedence, OSHA will be able to enforce certain occupational safety and health standards currently not covered by FAA oversight.

“Safety is our number one priority – for both the traveling public and the dedicated men and women who work in the transportation industry,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “It’s important that cabin crewmembers on our nation’s airlines benefit from OSHA protections, including information about potential on-the-job hazards and other measures to keep them healthy and safe.”

“This policy shows the strength of agencies working together and will enhance the safety of cabin crewmembers and passengers alike,” said Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez. “It is imperative that cabin crewmembers have the same level of safety assurances they provide the public.”

Aircraft cabin safety issues that fall under OSHA standards include information on hazardous chemicals, exposure to blood-borne pathogens, and hearing conservation programs, as well as rules on record-keeping and access to employee exposure and medical records. The FAA and OSHA will develop procedures to ensure that OSHA does not apply any requirements that could adversely affect aviation safety.

Click here to read the full article

0



ss_blog_claim=49366b4e35f7fed9be0af15ba66ac54c ss_blog_claim=49366b4e35f7fed9be0af15ba66ac54c